Culture&Arts

Salma Hayek Is Not Thrilled with the Frida Kahlo Barbie, Either

Salma Hayek Is Not Thrilled with the Frida Kahlo Barbie, Either

Kahlo's daughter, Mara Romeo Pinedo, and great-niece, Mara de Anda Romeo, have threatened legal action, stating that Mattel is not authorized to use her image.

In an attempt to address the misconception that "Barbie doesn't need a job because she has Ken to provide for her", the brand released a collection of 17 "role model" dolls (AKA "Sheroes") for International Women's Day - representing "real women".

"Frida Kahlo never tried to be or look like anyone else".

That is, it's more Barbie-like than Frida-like. "Girls have always been able to play out different roles and careers with Barbie and we are thrilled to shine a light on real life role models to remind them that they can be anything".

According to The Independent, Kahlo's family is accusing Mattel of misrepresenting her appearance and disregarding the very values she stood for, like challenging post-colonialism, gender, class and race in Mexican societies.

Critics complain the doll doesn't reflect Kahlo's heavy, almost conjoined eyebrows, and they say its costume doesn't accurately portray the elaborate Tehuana-style dresses that the artist wore.

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But Kahlo's family soon issued a statement objecting to the doll.

Hayek was not the only one who raised her concern about Kahlo's image being used by a big corporate house.

Salma Hayek is slamming toymaker Mattel after the release of its new Barbie doll collection highlighting "Inspiring Women", featuring Mexican artist and women's rights activist, Frida Kahlo.

Critics have complained that the doll does not reflect Kahlo's heavy, almost conjoined eyebrows or unibrow, and they say its costume does not accurately portray the elaborate Tehuana-style dresses the artist wore. Beatriz Alvarado, a spokeswoman for the Frida Kahlo Corporation, said by telephone on Friday that the company had been formed by people who secured rights to market Kahlo's name and likeness after paying a fee in 2005 to Isolda Pineda Kahlo, one of the artist's nieces.

Mattel said in a statement that it worked with the Panama-based Frida Kahlo Corp., "which owns all the rights".

The image of Kahlo and her instantly recognizable eyebrows - which she let grow into a single strip of dark brow in defiance of convention - has been stamped onto an explosion of consumer products in recent years: nail polish, bags, shoes, notebooks and much, much more.