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Facebook spent $9 million on private jets, security for Mark Zuckerberg

Facebook spent $9 million on private jets, security for Mark Zuckerberg

Baser said ad preferences can also be set to prevent specific advertisers from showing ads on Facebook.

Zuckerberg began to explain a few of the basics, but eventually said his team would follow up with more information later.

David Baser, Facebook's product management director, claims that Facebook isn't the only company that offers such tools and has access to user data.

Through both days of congressional hearings, Zuckerberg was peppered with questions about the censorship of conservatives on Facebook.

Facebook, embattled in a scandal over the mishandling of user data, confirmed on Monday that it also collected information from people beyond their social network use.

Social plugins, like the "Share" or "Like" buttons, which you can find on outside websites, like shopping pages and news articles. That is the date when Facebook launched "Tag Suggestions", a feature that suggests people to tag after a Facebook user uploads a photo.

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Right now, only European users are being asked to confirm their privacy settings in order to continue using the app, but that may change. Other information comes from "cookies", small files stored via a browser and used by Facebook and others to track people on the internet, sometimes to target them with ads. According to Baser, they are: "Providing our services to these sites or apps; improving safety and security on Facebook; and enhancing our own products and services".

Other companies, including Twitter (NYSE:TWTR), Pinterest and LinkedIn (NASDAQ:MSFT) have similar setups, Facebook says. Recode also reported that Martin Sorrell, founder and CEO of WPP, the world's largest advertising group, resigned amid an investigation into personal misconduct and improper use of company funds. Google has a popular analytics service. Baser said this data collection process is the same for any website or app, including YouTube, Google or Twitter, not just Facebook. Your browser (Chrome, Safari or Firefox) shares your IP address so the website knows where to send the site content.

"So when a website uses one of our services, your browser sends the same kind of information to Facebook as the website receives".

A US federal judge ruled on Monday that Facebook Inc must face a class action lawsuit alleging that the social network unlawfully used a facial recognition process on photos without user permission.

Privacy concerns have swamped Facebook since it acknowledged last month that information about millions of users wrongly ended up in the hands of political consultancy Cambridge Analytica, a firm that has counted US President Donald Trump's 2016 electoral campaign among its clients.