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US, UK, France launch joint strikes on Syria

US, UK, France launch joint strikes on Syria

At the same time 54 percent of those surveyed said that UK Prime Minister Theresa May should have held a parliamentary debate and vote before intervening militarily in Syria, while 30 percent of respondents said that it was not necessary, according to the survey.

The Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons has been "working in close collaboration" with United Nations security experts "to assess the situation and ensure the safety of the team", it said.

Parly said some of the strikes had targeted two sites used by Bashar al-Assad's regime to store and assemble chemical weapons near the Syrian city of Homs.

Syrian state media reported that internal security forces had entered Douma on Saturday and that the town would be secured within hours.

May said intelligence and open source accounts indicated that the regime was behind the attack in Douma last Saturday.

"Given the context of the recent worldwide response to the use of a nerve agent in the United Kingdom, the clear targeted objective of the strikes, and the repeated blocking by Russian Federation of diplomatic solutions through the UN, we believe the Prime Minister was justified in standing with our American and French allies in this concerted action".

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"And the world said "enough" to the use of such weapons".

"The prime minister has the full authority, on the basis of all the information at her disposal, to order the type of military action which has been carried out this morning and we reject any suggestion that she was not entitled to do so".

British Prime Minister Theresa May described the strike as "limited and targeted".

Meanwhile, Britain's main opposition Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn described the USA -led military strikes on Syria jointly staged by three leading Western countries as a "legally questionable action", saying that the British government should "not taking instructions from Washington".

Former Labour foreign secretary David Miliband, now head of humanitarian relief group the International Rescue Committee, said military action needed to be part of a wider political strategy.

He reiterated that Canada condemns the use of chemical weapons in Ghouta. "It is not about regime change", May said in statement made from her country residence at Chequers just minutes after U.S. President Donald Trump announced the strikes from the White House.