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Crude oil leaks into floodwaters after train derails in Iowa

Crude oil leaks into floodwaters after train derails in Iowa

The public's interest in the train derailment is making it extremely hard for clean up and construction crews to get in and out of the area. About 31 cars derailed after the tracks reportedly collapsed due to saturation from flood waters from adjacent Little Rock River.

(Rock Valley) - Iowa Governor Kim Reynolds (R) visited the flooded ares of northwest Iowa Saturday afternoon.

BNSF had hazardous materials and environmental experts on the scene and had begun cleanup within hours of the derailment, Williams said.

The train's operator BNSF said 14 of the derailed cars had leaked oil, the Lyon County Daily News reported.

Rock Valley, a small city just to the southwest of Doon where more than 30 oil tanker cars derailed into floodwaters, has shut off all its drinking water wells.

Officials say 230,000 gallons spilled. "We had a large supply in our water towers and we are using our interconnection with rock valley rural water to recharge our water supply".

Crews spent Saturday containing the spill and building a temporary road to move equipment to the crash site to make it easier to remove the piled-up train cars and advance the cleanup, the Sioux City Journal reported.

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Cleanup of an oil spill caused by the derailment of almost three dozen oil tankers in northwestern Iowa has begun.

Cities downstream from the spill are monitoring their water systems.

One or more of 31 tanker cars on the derailed train is leaking into floodwaters surrounding the tracks near Doon, about 40 miles (65 kilometers) southeast of Sioux Falls, South Dakota. The nearby Little Rock River rose rapidly after heavy rain Wednesday and Thursday.

Omaha's public water utility - Metropolitan Utilities District - is monitoring pumps it uses to pull drinking water from the Missouri River.

Danger from the spill has been exacerbated by recent rainfall, which has caused the Rock River to overflow its banks along the route of the train tracks.

The Rock River had already carried some oil to Rock Valley by midmorning, said Ken Hessenius with the Iowa Natural Resources Department.

The derailment also caused concern downstream, including as far south as Omaha, about 150 miles from the derailment site.