Medicine

A late dinner can cause the development of cancer - scientists

A late dinner can cause the development of cancer - scientists

Eating final meal of the day earlier could lessen cancer risk, a new study suggests. The scientists estimate that these individuals enjoy a 20% drop in cancer risk when compared to those who eat dinner after 10 p.m. or eat right before climbing into bed.

Having your last meal before 9 pm or at least two hours before going to bed could lower the risk of breast and prostate cancer. Such data leads the study, conducted at the Institute of Barcelona on world health (Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal)), Spain.

"Modern life involves mistimed sleeping and eating patterns that in experimental studies are associated with adverse health effects", the researchers explain.

"Disruption of your body clock and reduced ability to process glucose are possible mechanistic factors linking late-night eating to cancer risk".

Breast and prostate cancers are also among those most strongly associated with night-shift work, circadian disruption and adjustment of biological rhythms. Lung, prostate, colorectal, stomach and liver cancer are the most common types of cancer in men, while breast, colorectal, lung, cervix and stomach cancer are the most common among women. Given that the study was based in Spain, future studies will also require a more diverse group of participants.

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The study was published in the International Journal of Cancer.

Participants were also asked to complete a Food Frequency Questionnaire to look at their dietary habits and adherence to cancer prevention recommendations. The researchers believe that their findings could have serious implications for cancer prevention recommendations - which now don't take meal timing into account, the "Mirror" reported. According to a new study, a diet rich in fruits and vegetables can lower risks of developing breast cancer in women.

"The impact could be especially important in cultures such as those of southern Europe, where people have supper late", Kogevinas said.

Breast and prostate cancers are also among those most strongly associated with night-shift work, circadian disruption and adjustment of biological rhythms.