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Argentine Senate rejects historic abortion law

Argentine Senate rejects historic abortion law

Earlier in the day, scores of buses had brought people from around the country into Buenos Aires for the dueling rallies outside Congress.

Argentina's Senate has rejected a bill to legalize elective abortion in the first 14 weeks of pregnancy. The proposal was the subject of mass protests and the Aborto Legal Ya campaign, with supporters carrying signs on Wednesday displaying coat hangers and the word "Adios"-a reference to unsafe methods that have been used by women to terminate unwanted pregnancies".

The Senate in predominately Roman Catholic Argentina has rejected a law that would have legalized abortion, rebuffing a grass-roots abortion-rights movement.

Sen. Esteban Bullrich, who opposed the legislation, said "This bill, which is a bad one, does not intend to reduce abortion".

Abortion is illegal in the South American country except in cases of rape or risks to a woman's health.

She added that the Senate had "therefore chose to agree on a system which forces women, girls and others who can become pregnant to undergo clandestine and unsafe abortions".

But the contentious issue has divided Argentines, pitting conservative doctors and the Catholic Church against feminist groups and physicians.

Soros also funds the pro-abortion Human Rights Watch (HRW), which has worked to pressure pro-life countries to legalize abortion.

The alleged "human rights" organization Amnesty International has been hammering Argentina to repeal its constitutional provision protecting preborn babies from abortion.

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Worldwide human rights and women's groups have been closely following the vote, and figures such as USA actress Susan Sarandon and "The Handmaid's Tale" author Margaret Atwood supported the pro-abortion cause in Argentina.

The world was watching and Argentina's senators failed.

After more than 15 hours of debate, a total of 38 senators voted against the abortion bill while 31 voted in favor, in spite of pressures from a wealthy abortion cabal with powerful backing from the mainstream media.

In Brazil, which is home to the world's largest population of Catholics and fast-growing evangelical faiths, abortion carries a punishment of up to three years in prison.

Uruguay and Cuba are the only two countries in Latin America to have decriminalised abortion.

In neighboring Chile, the Constitutional Court previous year upheld a measure that would end that country's absolute ban on abortions, permitting abortions when a woman's life is in danger, when a fetus is not viable and in cases of rape.

Argentine protesters dressed as handmaids from the book during rallies.

It is also legal in Mexico City.