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Where to watch meteor shower in UAE next week

Where to watch meteor shower in UAE next week

During the Perseids' peak on the nights of August 11-12 and August 12-13, skywatchers should see about 60 to 70 meteors per hour, Space.com said. Shooting stars could happen every minute. And conditions for viewing the meteors will be next to flawless this year.

This year the meteor shower is predicted to reach its peak on the night of August 12, as Earth passes through the densest part of the Comet 109/Swift-Tuttle's trail. If stargazers miss the show on Saturday, they also can look for it again beginning at about 11 p.m. on Sunday night.

Meteor showers are caused when meteoroids, who were once part of a comet or asteroid, start hitting Earth's atmosphere in streams.

Even though this may be somewhat of a down year, the Perseids still typically are one of the best meteor shows of the year.

Swift-Tuttle measures a massive 16 miles, and last passed by Earth in 1992. "Most particles are about the size of a small rock or beach sand, and they weigh just about 1-2 grams (roughly the same as a paperclip)".

The showers are named after the constellation Perseus because the direction from which they come in the sky lies in the same radiant as Perseus. The best time to be outside to catch the peak is between midnight and dawn. However, it's important to set an alarm clock, because the meteor shower occurs while most people are sleeping.

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This weekend's show is expected to be particularly spectacular.

From Aug.11-13, the Perseid meteor shower will send between 60 and 70 meteors shooting across the sky every hour.

To make the best of the meteors, observers should avoid built-up areas and try to find an unobstructed view to the east. However, they can be seen clearest after sunset.

This means we'll be left with a dark sky for the rest of the night, and only city light pollution will interfere with the show.

"Relax, be patient, and let your eyes adapt to the darkness", J. Kelly Beatty, senior editor of Sky & Telescope magazine, said in a statement.

With a new moon providing an extra-dark backdrop to the spectacle, the shooting stars will be brighter than ever.