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Naomi Osaka close to signing historic deal with Adidas

Naomi Osaka close to signing historic deal with Adidas

Naomi Osaka had complex emotions to grapple with on the podium after winning the US Open following a Serena Williams meltdown.

The multi-millionaire husband of Serena Williams has broken his silence in the wake of his partner's meltdown at the US Open and the cartoon controversy that followed.

Tennis star Serena Williams was making headlines earlier this week following a clash between her and an umpire during the final match at the 2018 US Open Tennis Championships.

Osaka, whose world ranking rose 12 spots to No. 7 on Monday, made history on September 8 in NY by becoming the first Japanese to win a Grand Slam singles title, beating decorated veteran Serena Williams in straight sets.

"Ramos is tough, one of the best umpires in the world".

Women's governing body the WTA supported Williams and chief executive Steve Simon said the umpire showed her a different level of tolerance over her outbursts than if she had been a man. "For me to say "thief", and for him to take a game, it made me feel like it was a sexist remark", she said, arguing that male athletes can and have said worse without receiving penalties.

Osaka had just won her first Grand Slam title after defeating the 23-time major victor Serena Williams at the U.S. Open on Saturday.

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"He did what he had to do in that match, because she overstepped the limit".

"I couldn't tell what was going on, because it was just so loud in there", she added.

While Williams was immediately backed by the Women's Tennis Association (WTA) and the United States Tennis Association (USTA) and hailed as a hero by countless feminists and the establishment media, Ramos kept quiet, as International Tennis Federation (ITF) rules bar umpires from commenting on their matches.

"I think that's a bit far-fetched", the Briton, who is the older brother of former world number one Andy Murray, told BBC Sport. She said on Tuesday both sides shared the blame for the incident. "It's a delicate situation, but a la carte arbitration does not exist".

"I'm fine, given the circumstances", he said.

Speaking to Tribuna Expresso earlier this week in his native country, Ramos indicated he was at peace with his decisions because he didn't pick and choose when to apply the rule book.

"But if you were talking about my tennis, I think my tennis is not very Japanese".