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Trump Insults Puerto Rico Mayor Following Hurricane Maria Remarks

Trump Insults Puerto Rico Mayor Following Hurricane Maria Remarks

"Potentially, Hurricane Isaac right now is tracking south of the island, but we are - we had several thousand people inside Puerto Rico right now working on long-term recovery that has shifted to the response mode to monitor, as Isaac passes to the south", Long replied.

U.S. President Donald Trump speaks during an Oval Office meeting on hurricane preparations for Hurricane Florence at the White House in Washington, U.S., September 11, 2018.

"It was one of the best jobs ever done with respect to what this is all about", Trump said Tuesday at a briefing, referring to the Hurricane Maria response.

The study concluded that the initial death toll of 64 only included those killed directly by hurricanes Maria and Irma - either by drowning, flying debris or building collapse. "Then, a long time later, they started to report really large numbers, like 3000", he tweeted Thursday.

Trump's tweets - which came as a highly unsafe Hurricane Florence churned toward the Carolinas - brought an immediate rebuke from Democrats in Congress.

A Washington Post-Kaiser Family Foundation survey found that 52 percent of respondents said Trump did a "poor" job with his response.

The Republican president suggested the hurricane death toll was artificially inflated by adding those who passed away from natural causes such as old age.

More news: Hurricane Florence tracker: 'STORM OF A LIFETIME' to batter North Carolina

The official figure was released last month after an independent study.

"Puerto Rico was, actually, our toughest one of all because it's an island, so you just - you can't truck things onto it".

CEIBA, Puerto Rico - The stockpile of bottled water stretches down an unused runway in Ceiba.

During times of trouble and strife, the American people look to their president for guidance and reassurance that the government can handle a crisis, but as Hurricane Florence comes barreling toward the Carolinas, they won't be getting any of that from President Trump, Seth Meyers said on Wednesday's Late Night.

The governor of Puerto Rico, who commissioned the research, said he accepted the estimate as official.

For many, Trump's boast about "one of the best jobs that's ever been done" was hard to square with their daily reality: Blackouts remain common; almost 60,000 homes are covered by only a makeshift roof not capable of withstanding a Category 1 hurricane; and 13 per cent of municipalities lack stable phone or internet service.

That assessment brought sharp rebukes from officials in Puerto Rico and congressional Democrats.