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Rocket Headed For International Space Station Fails, Makes Emergency Landing

Rocket Headed For International Space Station Fails, Makes Emergency Landing

The two-man crew of a Soyuz rocket has made a successful emergency landing following the failure of a Russian booster rocket carrying them to the International Space Station (ISS). The capsule made a "ballistic landing" and rescue teams recovered the pair, who are reportedly in "good condition", NASA says.

Their arms and legs flail while being shaken around at he moment the failure occurred.

The two astronauts were to arrive at the International Space Station (ISS) six hours after the launch to join an American, a Russian and a German now aboard the station.

Search and rescue crews are heading to the landing site.

It was the latest in a recent series of failures for the Russian space program, which is also used by the U.S.to carry its astronauts to the station.

After it became clear that the crew had landed safely, Russian President Vladimir Putin's spokesman Dmitry Peskov told reporters: 'Thank God, the crew is alive'.

ABC News reported that Russian Deputy Prime Minister Yuri Borisov announced that all manned launches will be suspended until the investigation is complete and the cause of the rocket's failure can be pin-pointed. "Spaceflight is hard. And we must keep trying for the benefit of humankind", ESA astronaut Alexander Gerst tweeted from aboard the space station as he watched and photographed the launch from space.

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NASA administrator Jim Bridenstine issued a statement saying he was "grateful that everyone is safe" and that "a thorough investigation into the cause of the incident will be conducted". But soon after the landing, US and Russian officials said that rescue forces were in contact with the astronaut and cosmonaut.

'The capsule is returning via a ballistic descent, which is a sharper angle of landing compared to normal. The ascent proceeded normally until the separation of one of the rocket's booster stages, by which point the crew had already experienced microgravity.

USA astronaut Nick Hague, right and Russian cosmonaut Alexey Ovchinin, member of the main crew of the expedition to the International Space Station (ISS), speak prior to the launch of Soyuz MS-10 space ship at the Russian leased Baikonur cosmodrome, Kazakhstan, Thursday, Oct. 11, 2018. Roscosmos, the Russian firm that operates the nation's space agency and is responsible for Soyuz launches, will not hold any news conferences today.

Luckily, these crew members will not be stranded on the space station, as they will return to earth in the capsules they traveled to the station in.

"The boys have landed", Mission Control assured the crew consisting of one American, one German and one Russian.

There are a few potential alternatives to leaving the ISS without a crew for the first time in almost 20 years, but given the risk-adverse nature of human spaceflight, it seems unlikely NASA or Roscosmos will want to tempt fate on any of them. NASA is working closely with Roscosmos to ensure the safe return of the crew.

The launch failure raises questions about the continued reliability of Russia's Soyuz launch system, which lost a cargo spacecraft at the end of 2016 and sent a Soyuz capsule with a hole in it to the ISS earlier this year.