World News

EU Wobbling, Juncker Admits No Deal Brexit 'Would Be a Catastrophe'

EU Wobbling, Juncker Admits No Deal Brexit 'Would Be a Catastrophe'

In her plea for support two days before the parliament's vote, May said lawmakers must not let down the people who voted for Brexit, Reuters reported.

"I don't like the prospect of a no deal".

'If not, we risk a break with the British tradition of moderate, mainstream politics that goes back to the Restoration in 1660.

"MPs need to remember that Britain, its people and its traditions are the mother of Parliaments".

Mr Hunt warned: "If we were, as a political class, not to deliver Brexit, that would be a fundamental breach of trust between the people and the politicians".

'If EU intransigence persists, we must be willing to leave the EU at the end of March on World Trade Organisation terms.

"It will open the door to extremist populist political forces in this country of the kind we see in other countries in Europe", he added.

Writing in the Sunday Express, Mrs May said: "You, the British people, voted to leave".

More news: Government Shutdown Forcing Miami Airport To Close Terminal

He said if it is defeated, Britain should continue to press the European Union for a deal that "respects the referendum but if Brussels' "intransigence" persists "we must be willing to leave the European Union at the end of March on World Trade Organisation terms".

Transport Secretary Chris Grayling told the Daily Mail that the party risked cheating and isolating the millions of United Kingdom citizens who voted to leave the European Union, ending its 350-year period of "moderate" politics.

And hedge fund manager Crispin Odey, who donated more than £870,000 to pro-Leave groups, said: "My view is that it ain't going to happen".

They both attributed a lack of direction from Brexiteers as one of the reasons for their pessimism.

In a significant shift of tone apparently created to win over hardline Brexiteers who have set their faces against Mrs May's deal, Mr Hunt warned that defeat next week would not necessarily provide MPs with the opportunity to choose their preferred version of Brexit.

"If we were, as a political class, not to deliver Brexit that would be a fundamental breach of trust between the people and the politicians and I think that would be something that we would regret for many, many generations", Hunt told BBC Radio 4's Today programme. I'm not really surprised about that. I understand that. The real difficulty...is there doesn't seem to be a coalescence around an alternative.

"The idea that if MPs vote down the deal, we head to no-deal has always been a false threat and the Foreign Secretary has now effectively admitted it".