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In deadly Nairobi attack, stories of fear, bravery and loss

In deadly Nairobi attack, stories of fear, bravery and loss

Following the terrorist attack on a hotel complex in the Kenyan capital, Nairobi, which cost up to 21 lives, authorities in the country are managing the aftemath, including conducting investigations, tweaking policy and policing coverage of the attack.

Al Shabaab, a Somalia-based al Qaeda affiliate fighting to impose strict Islamic law, said it carried out the assault on the upscale dusitD2 compound over US President Donald Trump's decision to recognise Jerusalem as Israel's capital.

Abdihakim and the other suspects - Joel Nganga Wainaina, Oliver Kanyango Muthee, Gladys Kaari Justus and Osman Ibrahim - are being held on suspected terror offences. Two were taxi drivers and one was a mobile phone financial services agent, court documents said.

The new Kenyan insurgents have a different ethnic profile from the Somali and Arab militants, enabling them to blend in with the general population of Kenya, thus it harder for security forces to track them.

"The investigations into this matter are complex and transnational and would therefore require sufficient time and resources to uncover the entire criminal syndicate", a statement from Director of Public Prosecutions Noordin Haji said. The son, Ali Salim Gichunge, as well as Violet Kemunto Omwoyo, were named as attackers in court documents.

Those close to Gichunge said they were stunned when he appeared in CCTV footage of the attack toting an assault rifle and firing at a white vehicle.

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President Uhuru Kenyatta said on Wednesday that a 20-hour siege had ended with security forces killing five militants, who had stormed the hotel complex, forcing hundreds of people into terrifying escapes. He spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to speak to the media.

Sixteen Kenyans including a policeman, an American survivor of the September 11, 2001 al Qaeda attacks on the US, and a British development worker were among the dead in the hotel 14 Riverside Drive complex attack.

Besides a hotel, the Riverside complex "is also home to the offices of foreign companies and high-end shops, giving them three high-value targets".

Sixteen Kenyans, including a policeman, an American survivor of the September 11, 2001, al Qaeda attacks on the United States, and a British development worker were among the dead at the 14 Riverside Drive complex.

"Where are you guys?" the agitated bomber said at least a couple of times, according to Abdullahi Ogelo, the employee.