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The Lunar Eclipse and Supermoon: How People Had To Watch It

The Lunar Eclipse and Supermoon: How People Had To Watch It

Lunar meteorite impacts have been filmed previously; this marks the first time one was filmed during a total lunar eclipse.

While this might not quite be the catastrophic event you are picturing in your head, it's potentially the first time that a meteorite impact has ever been recorded happening during an eclipse.

Madiedo and his partners have been checking lunar eclipses for years with the MIDAS (Moon Impacts Detection and Analysis System) network of telescopes, explicitly searching for impacts.

If witnessing a "super blood wolf moon" wasn't enough of a rare astronomical display, some eagle eye observers captured a meteoroid striking the lunar orb during the eclipse.

In a video from Griffith Observatory, the slam, visible as a brief, bright flash, occurs on the lower left part of the Moon while the scientists discuss the Moon's colour.

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The Moon Impacts Detection and Analysis System, or MIDAS, telescopes that Madiedo used have high-sensitivity video cameras, which are ideal at capturing these split-second events.

"We employ an array of telescopes endowed with high-sensitivity cameras that monitor the lunar surface in order to detect these events", Madiedo told ABC News. "I was really exhausted when the eclipse was over".

This image from video provided by Griffith Observatory shows an impact flash on the moon during the lunar eclipse. Astroimager Jamie Cooper, from Dustin, England, caught an meteor impact on the moon.

The size of the meteorite has yet to be confirmed, but Madiedo thinks it's about the size of a football, weighing about two kilograms.

The lunar strikes often come in the form of "musket ball" sized rocks no more than a few dozen grams or so in mass, according to Robert Frost, instructor and flight controller in the Flight Operations Directorate at NASA. Other also shared eclipse footage for evidence of the event.