Tech

Trump administration unveils order to prioritise and promote AI

Trump administration unveils order to prioritise and promote AI

The order calls for making federal data and computing resources more accessible to researchers, and for federal government agencies to use fellowships and training programs to prepare workers to operate in positions that utilize artificial intelligence.

"If there's no implementation plan behind the EO - with details, deadlines, and funding - then it may be worse than no EO at all", Wendy Anderson, general manager for defense and national security at SparkCognition, told reporters.

"We can not sit idly by and presume that our leadership is guaranteed", according to a statement released by White House on Monday.

President Trump is expected to sign an executive order on Monday aimed at boosting USA investment in, and development, of artificial intelligence capabilities.

Trump's EO focuses on maintaining the country's research and development on cutting-edge technology to benefit Americans. The White House's Office of Science and Technology Policy said in a statement during the speech on February 5 that AI was among the industries Trump was referring to, alongside 5G broadband, advanced manufacturing and others.

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During his recent State of the Union speech, President Trump said that he would work with lawmakers to increase investment into future technologies.

The initiative is the first step taken by the USA government to outline some sort of guidelines to help shape its ambitions in machine learning.

Establish standards: It will direct the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to create standards that foster the development of "reliable, robust, trustworthy, secure, portable, and interoperable AI systems".

America is widely considered the world leader in artificial intelligence - however, many believe the Chinese government's vast access to data might give it an advantage in the coming years.

A senior administration official said the plan does not include funding details and it's up to Congress to appropriate money.