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Evacuation plans for certain areas in Moz due to Cyclone Idai

Evacuation plans for certain areas in Moz due to Cyclone Idai

The cyclone will dump heavy rains and winds over Mozambique, before moving to southern Malawi and later Zimbabwe, the department's director, Jolam Nkhokwe, said.

The number of people killed in floods in southern Malawi has risen to 56, an official said on Wednesday, with the country now also on alert for an approaching tropical cyclone. In Malawi, almost 739,800 people have been impacted, according to the Government, with 45 deaths and 577 injuries recorded.

"We are expecting more than 100mm of rain in places; it could even reach 200mm or more in places".

The storm threatens a familiar natural disaster in Mozambique, which has already seen deadly floods worsened by devastating hurricanes in both 2000 and 2007. More than a million people have already been directly affected by the disaster.

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Some 62 975 people were affected by the floods in the provinces of Niassa, Tete and Zambezia.

The wave of cancellations came as the United Nations warned that "tropical cyclone Idai has regained intensity and is expected to make landfall near Beira city in central Mozambique" later Thursday. Almost 85,000 hectares of crops have been flooded, affecting more than 57,800 smallholder farmers. Flood water and food which has been in contact with flood water is not safe. Almost 1.6 million people are estimated to live in areas that could be impacted by high wind speeds ( 120km/h), according to the latest analysis from UNOSAT.

Tropical cyclones spin clockwise in the Southern Hemisphere, putting the city of half a million on the extremely unsafe and more intense side of the storm's eyewall, the zone of most powerful winds and where storm surge is maximized.

According to the Saffir-Simpson scale Cyclone Idai is now and extremely risky category 4 storm and has explosively intensified in the past 8 hours which is expected to make landfall by tomorrow. The latest projections indicate that Idai may then turn back east and re-enter the Mozambique Channel, potentially going on to impact southern Madagascar.