Tech

Google’s Area 120 launches new hyperlocal social networking app

Google’s Area 120 launches new hyperlocal social networking app

Maybe, or maybe not, because this isn't the first time Google has attempted a hyperlocal event-based social network.

Even after the shut down of Google+, which was meant to be a Facebook-competitor but it could never quite get to where Google imagined it, the company is reportedly working on another social network.

It's been five months since the shutdown of Google Plus, and Google have already begun public testing of Shoelace- their new social interaction platform.

If we look back, we will find that Google has failed every time in an attempt to create a social network.

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This social interaction platform differs from the standard social media platform, in that it allows you to meet like-minded people online, and encourages you to go on to develop real life friendships. Shoelace is being developed by Google's Area 120 team, which specializes in experimental projects - not all of which see the light of day. In other words, the app's offerings will only be as rich and varied as the activities - or "Loops" - in which its community expresses an interest.

According to a post on Android Police, the app is structured around meeting people that are near you and that share the same interests. Not unlike a dating site, users are then "tied" together based on their interests, " like two laces on a shoe". The users can also create their activities and invites others to join in. We do so through activities, which are fittingly called "Loops" ...

Just think of all the fun you could be having.

Shoelace is launching first in New York City and available for both Android and iOS devices, but you're going to need an invite if you want to try it out. You can request an invite by filling up this Google form. The app is now available on devices running Android 8.0 and newer or iOS 11 and newer, but you can only get a download link by requesting an invite (and subsequently being approved) through Google.