Medicine

What Might Be Causing The Vaping Illness

What Might Be Causing The Vaping Illness

The two latest confirmed deaths occurred in July in OR and Indiana, CDC's acting deputy director of non-infectious diseases, Ileana Aris, told reporters at a media briefing.

One week ago, the CDC announced it was aware of at least 215 cases in 25 states, although that number did not include additional cases still under investigation.

The U.S. health officials said it's unclear what is causing the illnesses but numerous patients reported their recent use of products containing THC, a compound found in marijuana, and some reported using nicotine-containing products.

The CDC said they are still unsure of the exact chemical or substance that these cases have in common, as the patients used a variety of vaping products.

So far, the cases all involved the use of electronic or e-cigarettes to vape nicotine, THC, CBD, or a combination, Meaney-Delman said.

CDC officials said an investigation into vaping-related cases nationwide found "clinical similarities among those affected".

The CDC official said at a telebriefing on Friday that the lung diseases are likely linked with a chemical exposure since they identified no infectious causes.

NY officials reported on Thursday, Sept. 5, they have narrowed a focus on vitamin E acetate, but CDC officials said it's too early to pinpoint one substance.

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Anyone who is showing the following symptoms after vaping should see a doctor: difficulty breathing, chest pain, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, fatigue, fever, headache or weight loss.

For that reason, doctors and health officials are continuing to suggest people stay away from all vaping products until the investigation establishes exactly what is at the root of the illnesses. Additionally, no youth should be using any vaping product, regardless of the substance.

Cases have also been reported in Arizona, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Iowa, Illinois, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Michigan, Montana, North Carolina, Nebraska, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Vermont, Wisconsin, and West Virginia.

"With new findings coming out, I'm more reluctant to say that vaping is less harmful than smoking", Robert Schwartz, of the Ontario Tobacco Research Unit, said in an interview with CBC News on Friday.

The Iowa Department of Public Health reports that as of September 06, 2019, there are eight cases of serious lung injuries related to vaping.

While some public health officials say buying bootleg cartridges with unregulated ingredients may be driving the problem, others are focusing on additives such as vitamin E acetate.

Researchers are now saying the vitamin e acetate found in the vape oils might be the cause of vaping-related respiratory illnesses.